Because I Have it all Together, and Other Lies I Want You to Believe About Me

Public Speaking – 7 Ways to Deal with Stage Fright

Stage fright sucks. I know because I have it. Despite having a degree in theatre, performing stand-up comedy and giving countless speeches in front of ultimately 1,000’s, that dreaded feeling of knots in my stomach before taking the stage, still occurs.

  1. Know What it is You’re Afraid of.

Being able to pin-point exactly what terrifies you, can help give you a game plan to combat stage fright.

So…what is it specifically that scares the snot out of you about speaking in front of an audience???

-Forgetting your lines?

-Falling off the stage?

-The simple act of people staring at you?

-Feeling vulnerable?

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3 Surefire Ways to Create and Sell In-Demand Speeches

Corporate Christian Humorist Funny Speaker Stacy Pederson

If there’s one thing that holds promising speakers back from launching their business, it’s this: a lack of confidence in their speech. Sure, you think that new speech or workshop is a great idea, but how do you know it will sell?

Imagine spending weeks or even months of time—plus the cost of document design, video editing and all the other pieces that go along with it—only to discover it’s not what your audience wants or needs.  How frustrating would that be?

You don’t have to leave it to chance, though. There are plenty of ways to test your idea before spending the time and energy on a full launch.

  1. Just Ask

This is the simplest way to get a feel for what your market needs and wants. Simply ask them. Create a survey with Survey Monkey (or even a Google form) and send it out to your mailing list. For best results, keep it short, but do ask:

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The Art of the Speaker Soft Sell: How to Get the Click Without (Really) Asking for It

speech coaching

 

We’ve all seen those old-style sales pages filled with yellow highlights and screaming red text and lots of “BUY NOW” buttons, and when we think of copywriting, that’s often what comes to mind. While that style of sales page can be effective, it’s not the only way to make sales.

 

In fact, by taking a more subtle approach, you might even find that you generate more interest—and potentially more sales.

Stories Sell

One effective way to entice readers to click through to your sales page is the same as when you are on stage- with stories.

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Seven Surprising Places You’re Using Copywriting (And You Probably Don’t Realize It) As A Speaker

When you hear the word “copywriting” do you immediately think of long sales pages, squeeze pages, and unwanted bulk mail?

You’re not alone in that thinking, but the fact is, copywriting is more than just sales messages. In fact, as a speaker, most of the content you produce could be called copywriting at least in some sense. After all, if you’re creating content with the ultimate goal of selling something, that is by definition copywriting.

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5 Huge Mistakes Professional Speakers Make on Stage from an Actor’s Perspective

Network Marketing MLM funny motivational inspirational corporate conference speaker humorist stacy pederson

I stumbled into becoming a funny speaker by complete accident. I have learned A LOT along the way. What I learned-I actually already knew. Let me explain:

I have a degree in theatre. What I learned and even taught when it came to theatre/acting performance, audience, communication, messaging, etc., has translated perfectly to the speaking world. All the rules seem to hold true for either mode of communication-acting or speaking.

It’s taken making a whole lot of mistakes and performing a loooot of really tough gigs to finally embrace who I am. I’m a performer with a message.

 

I’ve done free speaking gigs, drove hours for almost no-paying gigs, done back alley gigs, comedy gigs, county fair gigs, festival gigs. My cars broke down. Someone slipped something in my drink the last comedy club I performed at. I’ve traveled 12 hours one way to have the company never pay me. Been snowed in, iced in, dust-stormed in. (I choked on-stage during the dust storm-literally. I coughed and gagged on the dirt so much, I had to walk off after only 8 minutes.) I’ve bombed on stage. I’ve killed it-and a whole lot of in-between.

Now that you know some of my creds-here’s some huge mistakes from an actor’s perspective, I see other speakers make on stage. I’ve done several of these myself.

 

  1. Not Thinking from the Audience’s Perspective

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How to Turn Your Dream of Becoming a Speaker into a Workable Plan

How to Turn Your Dream of Becoming a Speaker into a Workable Plan


As a coach, it can be difficult to watch the lack of progress of so many promising speakers. They’ve dreamed for so long about creating a solid, sustainable business, and yet, all they do is dream.

You know the people I’m talking about. They attend conferences, sign up for free webinars, buy paid training, and sometimes even work with a coach or two. And yet week after week, month after month, year after year, they fail to make any progress toward their dreams.

Are they just lazy? No. It’s something worse. They don’t know how to move from a dream to a plan and they’re stuck. I know because I have been there.

Start With the Long-Term

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How to Be Funny When Giving a Speech – Speaker Public Speaking Tips

 

Modified Transcript for Video Above:

“I’m going to give you two pointers in regards to humor if you’re giving a sales presentation, giving a speech for your company, you have to stand up in front of a classroom, or you are a professional speaker looking to add some humor. The first one, and this is probably the most controversial that a lot of people may disagree with me on, but I do not believe everyone can be funny. What I mean by this is that humor requires a unique skill of timing. People either seem to have it or they don’t. It doesn’t seem to be an acquirable skill to the point of being hilariously funny.

Now everybody has their own unique sense of timing but there is a flow to humor, and the delivery, and the pause, and when you hit the punchline and so forth. Certain comedians have certain rhythms and other comedians have other rhythms. But again, you can hear the flow.

You can learn to an extent, but if you are not naturally funny, I don’t care how many classes you take, I don’t believe that you will ever truly become hilarious. My suggestion for you, if you are not naturally a funny person, is don’t try and be. You can definitely add humor and fun to your speech but you’re going to want to rely, maybe, possibly a tiny bit more, on a visual or even a video, a funny use of a prop.

My favorite is, if you have a signature story that you’re telling, then you are going to want one or two, or maybe three, punchlines written in somewhere into your story to make your story pop and be memorable and funny. Again, that requires a certain timing of when you should have that punchline in there.

The same is true with sales presentations. When you’re talking about pain points for your customers, there are certain places where there’s a nice flow and feel of when you can add a punch, one or two lines here and there, sprinkled throughout, that makes you appear funny without you having to require to have this skill of being hilarious.

Again, if you’re not funny, you’re going to want to find a little bit of help maybe in different areas of just sprinkling that humor, where someone help you write a couple of lines in.

The number two thing, and this is a shocker for a lot of people, humor is not universal. I’m going to repeat this. Humor is NOT universal. What you think is funny is not what everybody thinks is funny. Case in point, if you’ve ever gone to a comedy club, there was probably a comedian that you just thought was hysterical and then three others you didn’t think were any good. Or if you’ve ever watched Netflix comedy specials, more than one, and you’ve watched a couple and you’re like, “These people aren’t funny at all,” and then you’ve heard another one that you were just cracking up. Same with sitcoms, same with certain comedies. It’s your particular style of comedy. Because what you find funny is not what other people find funny, and vice versa.

There seems to be a distinct difference in humor style. I know this is politically incorrect but I’ve sat through enough audiences to know that what men find funny is different than what women find funny. Gender seems to make a difference.

The second is age. Age really makes a difference in the style of humor. I have found that the perfect — and I’ve heard other comedians talk about this — that the perfect age range is 10 years above and 10 years below you. It’s like a 20-year age span, and then the same gender and basically the same demographics, because humor is something that you yourself relate to that’s usually why you laugh. Because you think like that and that’s why it’s funny to you. If they’re talking about a different culture, a different lifestyle, a different age, you might find a couple of things funny but you don’t really relate in the way where you’re just busting out loud when it’s your demographic, your gender, your age. Again, highly politically incorrect but I really think there’s a lot of truth to it.

If you’re trying to add humor to your speech or sales presentation, be careful. Be careful that what you think is funny actually is to a majority of the audience, that you’re not coming across offensive. Because some male humor can be really offensive to women and vice versa. You’re going to want to be careful it doesn’t come across offensive, that it’s general, and that it hits pretty much the age range of whoever it is that you’re speaking to. Again, humor you could talk for hours on because it’s so complicated. Also, just reach out to somebody you know who’s funny and have them help you.”

 

Need Help Adding Humor? Contact Stacy directly. http://stacypederson.info/consulting

 

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Stacy Pederson Female Christian Speaker Comedian