I’ve almost died a bunch. Here’s why I’m not trying to be productive during Covid 19.

 

Stacy Pederson funny motivational keynote speakerI’ve almost died before. I don’t recommend trying it. It’s not that fun.

I’ve also lost a marriage, a job, a home, and support system all in three week’s time. I also don’t recommend that.

Due to tremendous rapid loss, as well as almost dying a bunch more, I was diagnosed with PTSD and went through severe depression.

Yet here we are where many people are, or will be, experiencing exactly what I’ve been through with job loss, health crisis, and life altering circumstances in an extremely short amount of time.

Right now is a being touted as a “perfect time” to write a book, develop a course, start a hobby, and a myriad of other things to “start doing”.

I see a little of what’s to come from learning what is now mostly behind me.

Here’s why I’m not trying to be productive during Covid-19.

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Keeping things simple means less stress. Stress suppresses the immune system and can trigger a whole host of other problems. It can make you physically, mentally and emotionally sick.

To say most people are experiencing an unprecedented amount of stress right now is probably an understatement.

Three weeks ago we were lapping up our lattes while our kids were galivanting around in a thing called, “school”.

Now we’re counting cases, tripping over toys, wondering what to sell, and debating if we should divorce now or wait and see if Covid strikes.

Too much change, with too little time to process, and too much uncertainty is more than enough to switch on the ol’ fight or flight response. 

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We are all fighting for normalcy, getting a grasp on the unknown, fear of illness or death for ourselves or our loved ones, and fear of financial instability for basic needs. It’s a fight for life.

When people say, “don’t panic”, they’re basically saying, “don’t be human”. It’s normal to be stressed, anxious or afraid. It’s ok to have those feelings-as long as you don’t stay in that mental or emotional space for too long.

Acknowledge your negative feelings. Take a moment to feel them. Then move forward or take a step back. (Fight-or flight.) Whatever you need to do to gain a better sense of control.

You can’t be “productive” if you’re stressed. You also won’t make sound, logical decisions which are important when taking on new projects. (Hence insane toilet paper hoarding. Not logical. Hoarding cheese, wine and chocolate-now that’s a different story in my book.)

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I’ve learned to listen to my body’s AND my mind’s alarm bells. I’m a flighter. I’ll be the first to run and hide under the covers. When my body or emotions are sending me signals, I take a step back. I don’t push forward. Productivity requires pushing forward.

Some people want to work and be productive for a sense of normalcy and also something to look forward to. A goal, project, new things to focus on to help detract and distract from what’s going on around them.

I did that. For a very long time. Here’s why I don’t recommend it:

When you constantly remain distracted or bulldoze through-when you do finally fall apart-it’s brutal. Disastrous. You’ll find yourself completely unprepared mentally or emotionally for the flood of pent up feelings or thoughts you refused to allow yourself to deal with as it was happening.

Instead, I recommend sticking your toe in the water EVERY morning. If you’re feeling good, and working on a new project brings you peace or joy, then move forward.

If you’re pushing yourself emotionally, mentally, or physically-STOP. Listen to your body and mind. What does it need to process what is happening around you? Quiet? Rest? An intense workout? Socializing? A Plan? Then do that instead.

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Slow your productivity so that you can forge out a new trail of living. You’re used to producing on a well paved highway that requires little thought or adaption. You were most likely living on autopilot.

You’ve suddenly been forced to now stare at an “off the beaten path” of what daily life looks like. A path that’s not forged yet. You can’t run full speed on an ungroomed trail. It takes time and work to build the trail first.

Build the trail of your new normal first. Don’t clutter it up with projects that will cause you new stress or even more levels of uncertainty.

There’s a lot of mental work, physical strain, and emotional re-routing that takes place when dealing with a lot of change. Give your body and mind grace with this.

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Rather than focusing on new projects or getting “caught up” I’ve focused my energy elsewhere. First and most important, I’m taking care of my mind and body. Second, I’m experimenting on trying new routines, priorities, and giving myself grace through all of it.

Here’s some ways I’m doing that to put myself in the best possible state of mind to handle the physical stress of uncertainty and change.

1.    I stopped setting my alarm until my kids’ online school starts. Stress is hard on the body. Your body needs healing time. Most days I still wake up around the normal time but a few of those days I slept 10 hours straight.

2.    I walk outside every day. Sunshine and nature calm the stress response beautifully. It rejuvenates me and boosts my creativity.

3.    I make relationships the #1 priority. My family and people I care about come first. It’s not always this way, but in times of crisis, this is THE thing that matters most. Everything else can wait.

4.    I’ve whittled down my work priorities to just three things and only three things. These things are what’s required, what brings me the most satisfaction, and what I’m the best at. Everything else will wait. (Yes! In times of crisis in your business you “should” focus on what brings you money now. When you’re laying in a hospital bed, as I have, money doesn’t matter much. You need your health, your mind, your relationships to get through. Period.)

5.    I don’t think about what “needs to get done”. Instead I test out certain times of day to try different things. My focus is more on my “training” (like an athlete). I’m working on  the skills of working vs running the race now. After just under 2 weeks, I have a good handle on what’s working for me. Things are kicking in easier, as well as being more balanced and focused.

6.    I do what’s right for me, so I can do right by my friends, work and family. You can’t do right when it comes to others if you’re stressed, angry, anxious, or sick. You need to focus on your own health in all areas so that you’re available and ready for those who need you.

7.    I don’t freak out over being inconvenienced. Most of the time we as humans, get frustrated or angry because someone has inconvenienced us. You get mad at your kids because they inconvenienced you. Same with your significant other. The person at the grocery store, etc. It’s a waste of negative energy on your end. So they got in your way or caused you more work. In the grand scope of what’s happening right now, who cares??? You’re going to have to work harder and deal with more for a time. Your comfort or convenience is not your “end all” right now. Getting through it the best you can is. You’ll be a better person for it.

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The truth is, when 2020 is over, the world is not going to “return to normal” and hopefully you won’t either. Instead, there will be a “new normal”.

The quicker you can learn the skills to adapt by taking the time to process your feelings and emotions as they come, experimenting with your routine, and embracing rapid change instead of fighting it, the better for you.

If you want to be healthy and productive in the long run,

Yes, I could be richer financially if I pushed out a new project, but at what cost? I’m focusing instead on being richer in wisdom, relationships, health and skill of living. You can’t make money lying in a hospital bed. Trust me. I’ve been there.

 

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Stacy Pederson is a funny motivational Keynote Speaker, who’s almost died a bunch. 

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14 thoughts on “I’ve almost died a bunch. Here’s why I’m not trying to be productive during Covid 19.

  1. Hummm… I’m the poster child for pushing forward. I’ve been busier since quarantine and by the end of the day I’m exhausted. I’ll take your advice to heart. It may be time to slow down a bit.

  2. Thank you for this! I’m a mental health counselor and worry about money has me looking for a second job and yet I find I am struggling just to function daily. It’s throwing me because I usually role with crisis. This is different. I will try to take your advice to heart because it’s my instinct to do exactly what you suggest. My fear is driving me to push….
    Thank you Stacy!

    1. First, thank you for the work that you do. I totally think you’re correct when you say this is different. As you know, when a crisis hits it’s usually just one or two areas in your life-not everything all at once. It’s hitting everything right. As a counselor, just because you “know what to do” doesn’t make it easier because you’re a human experiencing all of it-justlike the rest of us. I hope you give yourself grace so that you can find your grounding. LOTS of people are going to need your help very very soon. Hang in there!!

  3. Almost in tears. This is right on time. I work in childcare as the school director, so it’s very important for me to be at the school. But I’m also a recent cancer survivor and my husband and parents have been concerned with me still having to work to keep our doors open and service are existing families. They all want me to stay home since my immune system is compromised. And I do too. But not sure if I’ll loose my job and be able to contribute to my household. Money doesn’t matter but it does at the same time. Not sure what to do. I know what I want to do but haven’t moved on it yet. But I’m trying to listen to the wisdom in this article. Thank you for it. At 25 years old, I am a huge pusher and my body has screamed at me for it (hints the cancer) how do I slow down and truly make life simple while making an impact.

    1. Victoria! I’m so sorry you’ve struggled with cancer and are now facing this. I can’t tell you what to do-only you know what’s right. BUT, sometimes us women need “permission’ from other women to know it’s ok to go with your gut. You said you know what you want to do but haven’t moved on it yet. I also hear in your comment that making a difference really means something to you. To the point you’ll put your self at risk to keep serving. I know you love those kids. But you know from your own story, that you can’t make much of a difference when you’re sick. I also totally understand money. But if you have your husband’s support, and you’re able to talk with your family around those fears to see if they’d be willing to pitch in until this over…Again, it’s your life and you have to live the day in and day out of whatever choice is made. However, if you’re looking for a cheerleader to say it’s ok to step back for a bit-you’ve got one. From the teeniest glimpse of hearing who you are, I’m fully confident in you-that you’ll live you’re WHOLE life working hard to make a difference. How long that life is, though-that may be up to you. ❤️

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